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Unapologetically Canadian
Unapologetically Canadian

Episode 24 · 2 years ago

Interview with EcoSmoothie Entrepreneur Tasha

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Thanks to Verdun organization Toujours Ensemble, local farmers’ market visitors got to experience smoothies created using a blender attached to a bicycle in 2018 and 2019. The first year, 13 youth participated in the project, including Tasha, who spoke to me for Unapologetically Canadian. For a video of the bike and some quotes from our conversation, refer to: https://wp.me/p2buQs-598

Today's interview is with a young entrepreneur. It's an archive interview from the summer of two thousand and eighteen when the teacher on psom kids came to the farmers market in ver done. They also came in two thousand and nineteen and actually today is their last day. No, Friday is their last day participating for two thousand and nineteen. But I really think it's interesting to hear how young entrepreneurs enjoy these kinds of projects. I hope you enjoy it. So my name's Tasha, I'm fourteen years old and I live in Verdone. Okay, so when I was really young, about elementary school, I went to to Joan's home and they just hope you were like homework and socializing and stuff like that, and then later on, when you're a teenager, you could go to bast ball and then they have a whole bunch of activities like fixing bicycles...

...and stuff, and I was there interested inside this, so I decided to try it out. Awesome. Okay, so fixing bicycles, like pass to old song is like an after school yeah, sort of association. They help. Basically they want to make sure that everybody succeeds. Right. Yeah, and so you've been hanging out there since you are, how old? Probably in fourth grade. Fourth Grade, okay, so a long time. Yeah, pretty long time. Okay. And so too, Jernsmi is like a nonprofit association. There are community center and they have a whole bunch of different product programs that you take it then. Okay. So now we're here. It's in that we in August, two thousand and eight ten, and I know you because we've been hanging out at the markets together, because you guys decided to do a cooption s for the summer. Yeah, in order to...

...set up a project where all of you could sell fruit smoothies at the market and you actually create the smooth smoothies with the bicycle. Can you explain how you do that? Who came up with the idea? Well, they're at first, it starts with all the older people, like that, adults, and they were like, okay, so we have this stuff planned out, like, oh, we're going to make smoothies out of this bicycle to be like cool, like to be different. So then after but all that, like decisions, like Oh, like festivals and stuff where you want to like sell smoothies, all art decisions. Right. So that's really cool. Okay. So the so the project sort of was developed before you got there. Yeah, and then, so when, when you came into it was what months? We had to do like interest, like, ok hmm. So it was like a job application. Okay, that's the whole like thing, like to create your job. Okay. So so you basically got you you...

...were applying to be part of the company. Yeah, and I think it was in June. In June, okay, and then, and then, what did you do? Well, then we had a whole bunch of like what do you call those, like signors? Hmm? Meetings. Yeah, meetings with a whole bunch of people, and even some people with their own like entrepreneur like they came and talked to us like how to do marketing or how to sell stuff or like a whole bunch of stuff, and they got a whole bunch of tips from different people. So that helped a lot, right, because you guys were in charge of the company. Yes, an entire comp how? Yeah, people came. Okay, so what and how many of you were there, or are there? There's about fifteen. I think fifteen. Gin's okay, and how many? What? Do you have a specific job or do you all get to do the same things, or you pick what you want to do? How do you divide the tasks? At first you decide if you want to do like Pud you shown, like...

...get the fruits and stuff, or cut firts. And it's also marketing, like to do like signs and stuff, as you do. You choose that. But while we're selling the fruit, we change, like who wants to like go around the block and give out flyers? Who wants to go on the bicycle and like Pida, or who wants to make the smoothies or stuff like that. So we each right and so. And do you have a certain number of markets you have to attend or you just sign up for the ones you can? Well, we signed up for the whole market, like mushy for me, but we also have sometimes some festivals that we go to where you get the highland games. No, we were not there, but I know there's two places that we might go. I'm not sure what they're called, but we have that planned out. Very cool. Oh, okay, so you still have one another week or two to go. Yeah,...

...but we're not sure if we're going to finished this month or next month? Okay, you decide. So you might actually add on some things if you want to. I started. Depends on how school because you're all going back to school. Y. When do you go back to school? The Twenty eight or Twenty Eight Aus? Wow, okay, so it's really soon, couple weeks. And so how is the experience been for you? Well, it's been really fun because you get to learn a whole bunch of stuff. And then were you paid? How we guys? Were you guys paid, or did you guys earn and then divide up what you earn? Or how does it work? We started out like, Oh, you guys start out with a certain amount of money from all bolting us and stuff that we need attend, like meetings, and for the hours you get, you get paid, but we only get paid our whole amount of money at the end of the summer. So it's like a project. Yeah, okay, don't get paid like per week or and thing. It's at the end. Oh okay, so each one of you has a certain stipend you get for being part of the project. Yeah, well, we each start without send amount of...

...money, example, two hundred button after it depends how much hours you make. Some people work more, so people work less. Okay, you get more depending. Okay, so they divided it, I would, according to how many people worked for how much. And so, from your point of view, what did you learn? I learned a lot like that. You have to have connections. Becau suffer expensive like to buy fruits and stuff to make your smoothies. So you have to go out of your comfort zone and talk to people, for they could like help you out. Or Yeah, that's what I've learned. And do you think you're going to have your own business later? Is that the been making you feel like you want to have your own business? Or probably not. My own business. It's a lot of work, but it looks really cool for people that do have their own business. I like have a lot of compassion for them because, yeah, that's so, but and okay. And then you know, my podcast is called unapologetically Cannadian, so I always ask everybody whether they're Canadian and so what...

...that means to them. Well, I think just being Canadian is born here or even not, like just like feeling that you're Canadian. You don't have to like be a certain way or something to be Cannadian or's like. So what do you? So do you consider something you need in yeah, and what does that mean to you? Just because you were boring here. Yeah, probably that not like my language anything, like a top multiple languages. So it's not. How many languages do you speak? I like saying two and a half. Okay, English. Also I'm learning sign language and Portuguese, so that's four languages post yeah. Well, wow. And what attracts you to sign language and what attracts you to Portuguese? Well, half of my family's Portuguese, so they took Portuguge a lot. I just didn't learn Portuguese when I was younger. Right, so that would be cool if I...

...could talk Portuguese and sign language. I just find it so interesting and it's really cool to communicate with people by sign language. And Yeah, that's it. It's really cool. Thank you, cash. I really appreciate your time and thank you very much for being part of the equal smoothies teams. It's been fun having you at the market to yeah, thank you. Thank you for listening to an apologetically Canadian. This episode was brought to you by notable non fiction. Notable nonfiction teaches people to grow through their own ingenuity. Find out more at notable nonfictioncom.

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