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Unapologetically Canadian
Unapologetically Canadian

Episode 6 · 2 years ago

Living Bodaciously with Jannette Anderson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Recently, I spoke to Jannette Anderson, the founder of Bodacity.ca.

We spoke about her nomad lifestyle, her calling to create a movement of women leaders and her reasons for calling herself Canadian. For the show notes, refer to: https://traceyarial.com/blog/jannette-anderson

So today we are speaking with Janette Anderson, who is somebody who I have met at a lift conference and she's a very inspiring individual and I'm really looking forward to introducing you to her. Janette, how are you doing? I'm awesome, Tracy. Thank you. I'M DOWN IN BEAUTIFUL SUNNY ORLANDO, avoiding Canadian winter. I know this is about being unapologetically Canadian, but I got to tell you I I love Canada, except for a couple months of the year. And do you always go down south then for the winter? I well, I created my mobility style so I could go somewhere warm. One time it was Pana, another time it was Mexico, couple times here. So yeah, pretty much anywhere. That's not dirty. Now, you're from Alberta originally, though, right. I am. Yep, I was born, I don't know about bread, but I was born bread and raised in Alberta, in Calgary, and that's where home is. I just spend a lot of time elsewhere. So do you still have a property in Calgary or do you have a home that you go back to, or do you just pick? When you decide to go home, you pick somewhere to stay. Yeah, I am actually one of those digital nomad, laptop lifestyle, mobile lifestyle, whatever you want to call it. It's a fancy way of saying homeless people who I about. Five years ago I decided, well, for a long time I've wanted to have a more mobile lifestyle and for a long time I was really attached to my house. I had lots of roommates and and had my house for fifteen years and I did what I called Power Nesting, because I moved twenty seven times in the first twenty nine years of my life. So when I finally did get a house, I power nested, which is kind of almost a way of saying hoarding. I had a lot of stuff and so so when I finally decided it was time to you know, I came home one day and thought about being mobile and and creating this different lifestyle and I looked at my my big beautiful plants and burst into tears and then I was like, okay, wait a minute, I can't have my ideal life because of a vicus. That doesn't seem at a whack here. So I finally really realize that I didn't know my stuff. It owned me, and that was enough to make me go no, no, no, so I had. I pulled the trigger that and I came home after being gone for several months and I had had some roommates or tenants who had done a lot of damage to the house. That was kind of the final Straw. So after doing the forty five thousand dollars worth of damage repairs and Reynaulds and so forth, it was time to sell the house. And so...

...the long answer to your question is nope. When I go home I'm often in a new place and, you know, have a room in someone's place. So that I was in the last place for a couple of years as a base and heading back in April I'll be looking for a new place. Wow, and so you leave in April, you basically you go back to Alberta in April and then you leave again when it gets cold and then you go back to Albert again. Is that how it works? Well, kind of. The last couple of years I wasn't able to be away as much as I wanted. I was sick with pneumonia a couple times last year, which is part of I'm allergic to winter. So really I just can't stay there or else things don't work. So I try to get away in either December January and leave for four or five months, depending on the circumstances. One of the things of the mobile lifestyle is you really have to also watch, you know, how long your way. You have to being up in Canada for a hundred eighty two days of the year or else it impacts things like upbor to healthcare and you have to watch how long you're wherever you are because that might impact taxation, and so it's not necessarily easier straightforward, but it's entirely doable and and then I get to explore and be in different places and check out different things. Yeah, that we met it and I believe we met in San Diego, right at the left conference there. That I think. So, yeah, Yep, yeah, and you, because you were holding one of these inspiring women leader nights. Can you talk a little bit about what you do with those and why you why are you other us all together for that kind of a discussion? Sure. Well, I let me give me a kind of the longer answer to that, because I think there might be a lot of people out there who are what I would call reluctant entrepreneurs. So these are people who might have had some kind of calling and or felt like they wanted to go in a direction and follow a passion and might be struggling with that. I I've been an entrepreneur my whole life. So of the past fifty years of no forty forty years of being in business, a full thirty of them has been being, you know, self employed or entrepreneurial or having my own business. And and I I love being an entrepreneur. I and there are days where not so much. But I really got this calling about eight years ago, nine years ago, I got this download from the universe kind of thing. I wrote all these pages in my journal about the thing called budacity and it was about creating a woman's group movement and a mindset, a community in a movement, and I wrote it all down and I read it afterwards and I went hey, I think you got the wrong person. You had the wrong number. This is not my stuff, this is not me. I'm not a feminist. Go Away and hung up the phone. Another first and they said, well really, you should pay atention. I was like, well, no, I don't even...

...really like women. Go Away. And then, because I've been working mostly with men most of my life and and so then I get the call again, it's like but, but, but, this is not my kind of stick and I don't get it. And Anyway, this whole dance went on for about eight years of me trying to be in resistance and avoiding this call and not really understanding why me? Why Women? Why Now? And and finally I just ever so graciously surrendered and said fine, but I'll do it. Leave me along and stepped into bodacity, which is bodacity got sea, is the website, but really stepped into this calling to create a community and a global movement of women who are either stepping into their power or amplifying their power. So they're owning their voice or they're really amplifying their voice to have more impact on the world. And there's kind of the two sides of it. So one is for women who are ramping up their business and who are experienced entrepreneurs, but they may be stuck or stalled and they're they're working on getting really clear and moving forward, and the other is for what I call the League of exceptional women, and that's what you're referring to. So I hold these events called wine, women and wisdom, and whenever I'm at an event, I kind of look around the room and see who looks like they might be an interesting person, who's WHO's cut rocking it in their business, who would be someone who might be a great connector someone that I've just, you know, attract to. Two might want to find out more about their their you know, energies, cool etc. And I tap them on the shoulder and invite them to these events after the event. So I have a an evening where I get people together, typically in a restaurant, sometimes in a hotel room, and I invite about somewhere between eight and twelve, thirteen, fourteen women from this event, which, by the way, if you're going to events anyways, that's a really good idea to do to connect with people on the Sunday, if it's a Friday, Saturday, Sunday event, that kind of thing, because many of them aren't flying out until the next day, they have nothing to do. It's a great opportunity to kind of network and really connect at a deeper level because typically in these events you're you're busy, they're busy, bees busy. So it's a way to really connect. So it's part of me. I like to say I connect and collect. I collect and connect brilliant women and so what I'm just to interrupt you for one second before you continue. I just want to say that for that particular event it's certainly worked brilliantly because the the people in that room, you get a connection because you've all just experienced this wonderful three day inspiring learning opportunity really and and then you get to actually talk with all of the people who were in the room with you. So each one of you knows where you came from. You have a lot in common just from the experience, and then you get to talk about what you want to accomplish in the world. It was really an extraordinary event. I loved it. Thank you. Yes,...

...and I think it's I mean Danny and he's lift event was also it was very inspiring. To start with, I think he's a beautiful man, fellow Canadian and and has such so much territy, and so he really attracts people of high and Trag your V as well, and you were one of those bright lights in the room. So that's why I reached out and said, Hey, want to come, and it's just a really good chance, like you said, to connect deeper with people that are interesting and to, you know, start to develop a relationship and connections and see how you can support each other. So I put these events together and basically we have some wine and we maybe some orders or people might order food, and they answer for questions. Who are you, who do you serve? What are you excited about creating and what support do you need? And that's it. That's the whole thing. No pitching, no sales, just what are you excited about and how can we help you? And then people brainstorm and then the next person goes when brainstorm and provide resources and ideas, and it's a great way to really create some tangible support and momentum for people who are up to doing cool, exciting things. Well, and then after we got home, we all were part of a facebook group of the of the same people, and so you get to continue connecting with people over time, which is also very helpful. It's a really cool movement you've started to build here. It's a I'm really excited to see where it goes. Both I think it has a lot of momentum. Thank you. I appreciate that and I really think that that in today's hyperconnected world, you know where everybody's on their phones all the time and in theory were connected everyone, we're feeling more and more and more disconnected from ourselves, from one another, and I think that's why really creating community, but actual community, not just you know, I five thousand friends on Facebook, but I don't even know many of them and that's that's not to me. That's that's something else. So so I would you know, I think we really long for getting heart to heart, belly to belly, and really connecting with other people more than we have been. Well, and as I'm getting to know you, I can see that some of what this work is connects to your regular work which, as you said, you've worked more with men. You've worked in the entrepreneurial space for a very long time. Can you talk a little bit about some of your successes there? So I'll thank you. I'm well, I've been basically in entrepreneurship since I came out of the womb, pretty much. I have my first business when I was for almost five had a garage sales so I could buy a book. There's a kind of a longer version of the story where that whole first venture was highly successful and not so successful so the highly successful part was, you know, mom said I wanted. I said to my mom, I wi this book Hidi, and she said we can't afford it. She was really sad and upset and and disappointed, and I think that's right. Then...

...is when I decided to never again have that kind of limitation and that kind of shame that I saw on her face be something that I and other women had to deal with. And so to me the solution was, okay, you don't have money, you just need to go get money. It's simple and you know, you got a love kids because they don't complicate profit. And so I I went, okay, any money, going to have money. I had seen someone have a garage shale in our neighborhood. So one day when mom was at work, and I'm sure neighbor was supposed to be watching me, but it was one thousand nine hundred and sixty four, so that a little more relaxed back then. I just hauled everything I could out of the House and and and priced it and so forth, including things like my mom's brand new, still had the tags on, futia wool dress. That was a forty dress back then, which now would be like a three hundred dollar dress or something like that, my toys and some household knick knacks and small appliance. Is Pretty much whatever a five year old could carry. I put carried out and price and soul and and my mom came home from work or wherever she was, and she and I went running up and look, mom, look, look, look, I got fourteen dollars in sixty two cents. It's not the right yeah, no, no, sorry, it was thirteen dollars and seventy two cents. That's how much it was and I was so excited. Problem solution done. Yeah, not quite how she saw it. It's so could imagine. Yeah, she was a little less excited about it than I was because she walks in the house and long behold, her appliances and some furniture and stuff is all missing, and and her dress, and so she's so the sharp version is I got spanked. I had to go around the neighborhood and try and buy back everything I could, which mostly the adults would send me back, you know, our household stuff, and I did get her dress back, but the kids wouldn't send me back by toy. So I ended up losing most of my toys, she took my money away and I didn't for a long time get the book. Well, for a while, couple weeks. So on many fronts people would say, oh, that doesn't sound like a very good start to your entrepreneurial journey. But I actually think it was a great success because I had a problem, I took action, I made the money and had I not, you know, had some interventions, I would have been able to go buy the book and so like I would have been able to fill that passion need of mine for Learning and Growth, which is what that was about for me, and and it would have been highly successful. Now, maybe you learned to enroll some of the people who owned the shop. Some very valuable lessons from that first venture. One is, don't go into be with the family. Not Really. Did you maybe make sure that they're actually part of it? Yeah, exactly. And the second lesson was, like you said, be more enrolling in that whole venture. But I also really did learn that...

...it is highly effective if you take action and and don't let fear stop you or get in the way. So so that was my very first venture. And then I had a day care in a housing tenement with up to like twenty kids in the summer when summer when I was eleven, my first employee was a nine year old who I used to Babysit and I paid him a dollar an hour and had twenty kids at three bucks a day and made them peanut butter and Jelly sandwiches every day for the entire summer and their parents could just happen because I got rhyth them for six or seven hours and anyway. So that was my first such funny time, wasn't it? I mean, can you imagine doing that now? Yep, yeah, so it was. It was. I think entrepreneurialism is in my bones. So I've had four iterations of my company positive results. All of them are variations on the marketing theme. So I've had an event planning company, a Marketing Agency, Marketing Training Company and, you know, most recently training, coaching, consulting courses, etc. And and have been doing that, like I said, for the better part of thirty years. So for many stances that would be considered successful, if not if not, at the very least doggedly persistent. And can you I like the the beginning of that one, because you combined to success and a failure in one particular story, which you know, always the case. There's very few times where we don't have some learning opportunities. With every success we have. I find it's a good, good lesson. So what can you talk about something more recently that you've been doing? I know that you're giving courses and you're doing all sorts of interesting things. So one of the challenges that I have. So a recent success that I had was I was hired by another person who has two brands, mastermind to millions and Javiology, and he brought me in to help him scale and grow these two brands, create and deliver all the content run is high end coaching programs, is like Twenty Fivezero Year coaching programs and stuff, and and did that, learned a lot about the industry, created hundreds of thousands of dollars of revenue for him, put couple hundred people through all of our various programs and really got clear on what works and what doesn't work in this kind of information product industry. So the success was that I, you know, was very successful in helping him create that foundation and revenue and growing is business and helping lots of entpreneurs. The the well I don't even actually think that as a failure part, but the where the learning came in was staying too long because it...

...was comfortable, it was what I knew I was, you know, easy to do, etc. Instead of moving into my own business more strongly and sooner so that I can make, you know, large dollars for myself and larger impact for myself and really focus on what I've been called to. Like I said, I was in resistance to odacity for quite a while and that was a an easy place to hang out and avoid really fully stepping into playing that bigger game that I was being called to. So the success is being, you know, valued for the contribution I make and the the opportunity to grow was owning my value and owning that and doing it for myself and really stepping back into my business more fully and more in a more committed way to turning it into a business as opposed to just self employment, ongoing self employment. Okay, so it's you're going from really a lifestyle business to a to what would you call the other business? I guess grow more from self employment to business, both our lifestyle but related in terms of, you know, making sure. I think I think we have to build a business around the life style we want, not the other way around. I think that's part of why people get unhappy and miserable is because they try to fit their life into their business instead of their business into their life. And so the difference is, though, working on scaling the business so that it's not me selling an hour of my time for an hour's pay, that I have products and services and programs that can be delivered without me, that I have other sources of income so that from the business, so that, again, it's not me having to be there all the time in order to be driving revenue. So that's the difference between Self Employment, in my definition, self employment, you have to do the work. You are the product. In a business, the product is independent of you. So and so that's what you're working on, is creating products that are independent of you. And so can you describe some of the products you're creating? Sure. So, for instance, I have a program called what the Hell do I sell? How to package, price and position your expertise, because after forty years of working with entrepreneurs, it's really the thing that they struggle with the most, and not not just new people coming in, because they actually haven't. They aren't clear enough on what they don't know to know that that's what they're missing. It's more the people have been in business for a couple of years who have been kind of in kind of out. Many, many coaches fall into this trap of wanting to get become a coach or speaker, trainer and consultant and they kind...

...of get in the game, but not a hundred percent, and they are in resistance to selling and marketing themselves. Frankly, why most businesses fail is because we suck it self promotion. And I, you know, hate to say it, but I one of the lovely things about Canadians is were humble and one of the terrible things about Canadians were too humble. It's true. It's true. It's a self promotion, although it's interesting because now that marketing is changed, the Seth Goden way part of I think that actually is a benefit for Canadians. I think that Canadians really can move into this scene now because now your personality and what you give away first is is is marketing. You know, I really think the new style of online marketing works for us very well. Yeah, I do too, that it's a real move back to authenticity, to being in service, to really showing up and giving, and we can. So, you know, I like to sometimes tease some of my clients about, especially Canadian, about the triple challenge of being a Canadian woman who, you know, is trying to step into entrepreneurship. Typically all three of those are our kind of you know, want to be in the back, not necessarily be seen, not be bold, not be bragging on themselves, elves, not be self, you know, branding themselves. And and even though it is very much more about a being in service, that doesn't mean that we don't need to be seen. We actually need to really step up to be able to serve, to be seen, to be able to serve, to be able to sell, to be able to serve, and I think that that's something that people still struggle with a lot. Yeah, would definitely. I mean, it's a it's a challenge because it's still much of our role, is is service, and when you're in service, a lot of times the person that's in front of things is not you. Yeah, so, YEP, so my primary program is called but the hell do I sell? How to package, price and position your team's really what we look at is the three wise and a what. Why do you do what you do? Because people buy why you do what you do, not what you do, and I can come back to that more later if you want to. Why should I pick you versus all of the other coaches or practitioners or whatever it is that you do? And why do I really need what you have? And Ninety nine percent of people talk about what what they do. I'm a Reiki Practitioner, I'm a speaker, I'm an author, I'm a you know, the KARMIC coach or whatever they may be, and no one really cares about the what, because the what is a commodity. There's like I was at a networking events once. There was forty people in the room and there was five cotton, five shamanic coaches. It's like, Oh my God, wow. Yeah, I know it was a bit...

...unusual and weird, but but still it's like, okay, so how on earth, if I was in the market for shomonic coach, how on Earth would I pick? Because they're all positioning themselves and exactly the same way. So part of entrepreneurship is really figuring out how to speak from your heart, your why, your you know I call your origin story of why you do what you do to other people's hearts and why, because they will resonate with you. At the base of the the intersection of your motivation and your intention. So I often talk about our why being where the intersection between our healing the wounds of the past and who we choose to be in the world. So where we throw our anchors in the future. The intersection of those two points is our why. So when we are clear on that with people it let's just let them know our motivation so they can, you know, again, resonate or not. It's very clarifying and they can know us, trust us, like US faster, easier. It's based on what's meaningful to us into them. So it's not all about pitch and hype and fluff and it really does let them know where we're coming from and where we're going to in terms of what's our intention or how do we want to serve or what's the difference we want to make in the world? So I think nowadays marketing is really about honing those wise so that people can get to know us, like us and trust US easier and faster and really just see if there's resonance there, because that's really what's going to help them pick you versus someone else. Right. Yeah, and so when you're talking to people, that's that and you're so your it must be kind of challenging to be from the person who is actually teaching other people how to sell. Well, you're also selling. Do you ever find that juxtaposition a little challenging? No, actually know, because typically what they're trying to sell is different than when I'm selling. When I'm selling them is helping them selves. So really fairly easy, because I want them to sell more. Now, even, and by the way, I'm a big believer in this is a big wag world. So even if they are exactly doing what I'm doing, if they had, you know, if they were exactly teaching entrepreneurs how to position themselves in the marketplace so they can be more effective, I'd be happy to support that, because there are more than enough demand for services. Then there is supply. There's sorry, just just say sorry about that. There's over five thousand new businesses started by women every single day in the US alone. It's like fifty four hundred or something like that. New businesses filed in the US alone by women, and...

...and that's just by women. Then there's all the ones by men and throughout all the rest of the world and so on, so per day. So there's more than enough work, quite a lot of new business. There's more than enough work for all of us. And and you know, a big believer and people will choose to work with someone that they resonate with and that fits their style and and has the promise of the results that they need for where they're at in the process. So yeah, no, I'm happy to teach other people how to sell, even if they're selling the exact same thing I have or something very similar, because I know that the person's going to resonate with them or with me, and there's more than enough for everybody. Well, and in the world that we're in now, to which is online marketing, you can create you can actually pick five people who do exactly what you do and create a summit and then all of you get more business together. So Hmm, absolutely. Yeah. And and beyond that, you know, people in our in our world, tend to do, fortunately or unfortunately, tend to take a lot of courses. Now I have a whole little rant about that, but they tend to buy a lot of programs, and sometimes the same thing over and over, frankly, because I believe for many of them they think that learning is the same as doing, and it's not. We don't know about that. Could I'm an author and I one of the things. Authors buy more books than anyone else on earth. I think it's just because you appreciate what that other thing is more than other people might. Could be. Could be. For many people, though, I think that they're they're busy buying courses because they keep thinking, well, I just don't know enough yet. I'll just get one more modality or one more tool in my tool kid or one more thing, then I'll step out, then I'll start offering. In reality, they don't need one more tool in their tool kit. They need to use the tools they have, because what often happens is what I call shelf help. Shame. What that means is they buy a course, they don't really do it, they don't consume it, they don't apply it, it goes on the shelf along with the whole bunch of other stuff that they've boughten, aren't haven't done, and then they just get to widen the gap between what they know and what they're doing and it actually takes people out of the game. It's one of my biggest complaints about this industry is that I think we're taking more entrepreneurs out of the game then we're putting in actually and and I think that's wrong and unethical and I am on a campaign to turn that around and not have that be the case by making sure that people actually apply what they're learning and that they they get the right tool at the right time, and so there's, you know, some real practical ways to do that, but basically I'm really committed to people moving forward and turning what they're are passion or their purposes into something that they're actually...

...profiting from and doing, as opposed to learning about and someday I'll get to it and so on. We need some that's a spoken like that token, like the true coach that you are. I love it and in the game. Get in the game well, and if any listeners want to join the vidacity group, I highly recommend it, because there's always a bold Monday and something Wednesday, seems to me, every time I go to that group, which I have to admit, I don't go on facebook daily, so I don't see everything, but every time I go to that group there's another challenge forcing you to get out there and actually do exactly what you're saying, is, get you your work out there well, and, and you know I mean we certainly do need to constantly improve and grow and hone our skills, but there's a big difference between that and what a lot of people do is avoid having to sell and market themselves by just going and honing yet another skill and getting yet another tool and so forth. So so there's a there's a tipping point at which, if you're if you're ahead of the people you're leading, then you can be a guide. If you're not ahead of them, then yes, you need to get the skills in the experience and the expertise to actually be able to shine some light down the path for them, but you don't need to be ten years ahead of where they're at and in fact, for many people that's a deterrent because you're too far ahead, you're too much the guru, you to disconnected from where they're at right now. So, yeah, I'm a big believer in implementation and action, which is why the facebook group is called Budacities Action Heroes, because it's about taking action to move those dreams forward. If there's any creative entrepreneurs listening, I thought I highly recommend it. It's a it's a fun group and there are lots of Canadians in there. which leads me to the last question, because we've already been speaking for thirty minutes. Believe it or not, the time got by so quickly. But my last question, as you know, is do you can sell it's consider yourself a Canadian and, if so, what does that mean to you? Absolutely so, I'm a citizen of the world. What means? I love traveling. I've been to, I think, twenties three countries so far and counting. Lived all over the place and I love, Love, love, Canada. I love our heart and Sensibility. It's going to touch my heart and making cry hi. I love that we are as generous as we are as a country. We do a tremendous amount of tithing and volunteering and and one of the highest volunteer rates in the world. I believe we live in one of the most beautiful countries in the world. Like I said, I've traveled a lot and seen a lot of amazing places and we forget how amazing the the country is that we live in and I love...

...that we are as committed to inclusion, acceptance and and getting that work, that we're one, more so than many countries and certainly more so than, not to get too political on you, but more so than our neighbors to the south right now, because I think that's so much a part of a Canadian value, is acceptance and inclusion and that we are better together and that it's all aspects of the same whole. Now, you know, not every Canadian feels that way and but I think culturally we are much more inclined to be tolerant in that way and that's one of the things I love, Love, love, and about Canada. And why would never not be a Canadian citizen because people have said, why don't you just move somewhere else as like, Nope, I love my Canada, I love the freedoms that we enjoy and I love who we are as a stand in the world. Oh how wonderful. Thank you very much and I really appreciate all your time. I think this is going to be a fascinating interview for our for our listeners. Thank you so much, very appreciated and if you are someone who is an entertor and you've been sorry, all right,.

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