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Unapologetically Canadian
Unapologetically Canadian

Episode 1 · 4 years ago

Seasonal, abundant and free

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

A Canadian identity reflects an essential part of who I am. To me, being Canadian means to live a seasonal (we have eight different seasons), free and abundant life. For the show notes, visit https://traceyarial.com/blog/seasonal-free-and-abundant/.

My name is Tracy Ariel and I am unapologetically Canadian. When I was in university there was a free listening room where you could go in, relax and hear great music on tapes. He had technologies staged a bit since then. I would ask to hear songs by Joni Mitchell and a Marie and the tragically hip parachute club, the cars, Gordon Lightfoot, Tom Cochrane, Leonard Cohen, Tom conners, April wine read, a McNeil rush or in Forester, the band lover boy, Katie Lang, Paulanka, Glen Gould, buffy say, Marie Bachman, Turner overdrive, Lenny Bro the, guess who, Wolf Carter and Neolon. At the time I didn't realize that almost all my choices...

...were Canadian. That was the first time I lived away from home, so the lyrics, sentiments and mood of many of my favorite singers comforted me and softened some of the loneliness I felt at that time. Since then, I've spoken to people who've taken on global or local identity and these in my own and I've come to recognize that being Canadian is an essential part of who I am. So what does that mean? To me, being Canadian means living a seasonal, free and abundant life. So seasonal where I live. I don't know if you're Canadian do, but temperatures here can drop, as always, forty in the winter. At the summer they can go as high as plus thirty. We enjoy snow, ice and flooding, fall colors, spring tulips, summer tomatoes, everything. It's like maritimes and deserts and temperate climbers...

...all at once. In fact, I'd say that we actually have eight different seasons and each of them have their good points and their bed points. So this year, right now, we're in deep winter. Usually that means there's enough snow for cross country skiing and lots of shoveling, but this year we've had a really early spring. It's March third today as I'm taping this, and we've already got rain and dirty snow, if there's snow at all, there's mud and lots of sunshine and warmth. And facts is supposed to go up into seven degrees on Tuesday. Shortly after that, very soon I hope, actually, will probably get another snowstorm, but after that will we should get some flowers starting appearing on our trees. My magnolias buds are definitely full,...

...and then we'll have basically some flowers showing up through the snow, if there's any left by the time the crocuses come up. After that, then we get to early summer and that's when the Dandelions sprouts and barbecue season gets underway, but it's not that hot usually and there's lots of rain still it. By midsome summer that's when the lack of rain dries up the grass and the gardens. Everything is this golden dry color and it's usually that's when there's summer heat waves and city always like me escape to the cottage if we can. But before we know it then it's going to be early autumn. That's then the morning frost hits and the brilliant red, yellow and orange leaves up here on our deciduous trees, the maples and the beach and the Birch and all those and if we're lucky will get a little moment of heat before we...

...go into late autumn. And because late on them is just full of rainy, cold grade days. The leaves have already fallen and is really not as much to look forward to it at that time of the year. I'm not keen on late autumn, although I love early autumn. And then early winter is just getting dark. It has snowy sunny days and long dark nights and you go to work in the morning in the dark and you come home in the dark and then you have the holidays and basically all of that winter. Then we're back into the the deep winter, which I talked about earlier. So that's the eight seasons that I think of and because of that, dry,...

...warm, pleasant shelter is on our list of priorities, and so that means that Canadians use actually more heat to eat our buildings and feed ourselves and keep ourselves warm and cool throughout the year then most other countries in the world. That's there's a reason why dug and Bob and Doug McKenzie were tuks. So the other thing that I wanted to express gratitude today is freedom. Most Canadians can't complain when it comes to freedom. We live in a representative democracy, so choosing our leaders comes down to us and then they make the decisions. Luckily, anyone can still run for political leadership, as I discovered when I did so myself last summer, although I didn't win. But there's also a free media and anyone can become a citizen journalist and publish their own work,...

...just as I'm doing with this podcast, and you can choose to assist people struggling with the institutions or authority, or you can just entertain or you can do pretty much anything you want, as long as you don't hurt anybody. And we also have freedom of speech, freedom of really religion and freedom of movement and although some of these freedoms are being threatened these days, so we'll definitely have to keep a fight to keep them. And, as matter of fact, the Montreal Press Club that I'm involved with is getting ready to host a to launch a Freedom Award for the first time ever. It's very exciting and that's going to be happening in April. And so one thing I want to mention, actually I forgot to mention, with the representative parliamentary system, that basically we imported our government system from Britain and then revised it for...

...own regional needs, because we have a lot more regional issues than Britain does. But what that means is that we don't have a direct vote for our prime minister, who's just in Trudeau. Instead we vote for a federal minister of Parliament, who in my case is David Lametti, and then they joined colleagues from the rest of the country to choose the prime minister, and ministers jointly recommend the prime minister to the Queen, who's the Queen of Canada, although she's also the queen of England, and she confirms their choice via her representative, the Governor General, who at the moment is Julie Piette, who used to be an asterlot. So very impressive leadership thanks to our government. And yes, it is convoluted and no, it's not direct democracy. It's definitely representative democracy, but and it can you always use improvement. Mostly it works. And the other thing that I'm really proud of when it comes to...

...freedom is Canada's many decisions to help the world's need. Recently we've helped it weave sheltered Haitian and Syrian refugees, but we've also taken Vietnamese boat people, American draft dodgers and many others in my lifetime. So I know that in the past we've had a horrible situations with our first nation, people's and treatment of the Japanese during World War Two when we set up internment camps. I'm not proud of either of those situations, but I am proud of our shelter of many people in cuting, including, in the past, before I was born, the huguenots, Mennonites, Home Pew Children and slaves who found freedom at the end of the underground railway because Canada banned slavery before the United States...

...did, which gave black Americans a chance to escape north and find their freedom. And many, many people did, and Canada's way better off for it because of the communities that were created by some of those people who escaped slavery in the United States. I'm also proud of our decision to join the world in banning the death penalty, providing universal healthcare, measuring with metric, allowing safe abortion, enabling our citizens to die with dignity, and soon we're even going to legalize marijuana, all of which I think are very good things, and I know that they're divisive. Dad, I know particularly you really don't like some of those things, but I think that there were the right decisions to make and I'm very proud that I live in a country that that operates under those assumptions. Also, in Canada, if you are a parent and you have a full time job, you have the right to stay with your...

...baby for the first year. Both women and men have maternity and Portunity leave in Canada, and I think that's a great tradition, although it's benefits don't extend to self employed entrepreneurs like me, and it doesn't instend to students or politicians, although it's starting to thanks to my colleague, maybe a Bluin A, who was able to get a municipal politicians maternity care maternity leave, and my other colleague, May, I used a panel, is taking advantage of that benefit right now, and I'm very proud of both of them for getting that underway. And that's just one of the examples of the kind of abundance that Canadians benefit from. We have so many things. Actually, I'm about to take a glass of water and we have more fresh water than any other country in the world. We also have multiple bee, bird and butterfly species,...

...both conifer and deciduous trees. Our landscape includes mountains, rivers, peep bogs, prairies, and everything in between. Because of the glaciers, we benefit from rains, escarpments, drumlins and cliffs, and we have ancient, classic and Modern Art. So three different coasts along three different ocean bodies, the Gulf stream passing our floors of shores. Basically, if you think of water, you can't help but be really know that you're blessed if you live in Canada. And none of that includes the diverse abundance of wonderful people, both those who helped shape Canada in the past and those who live in Canada today. And those are some of the people that I'm looking forward to interviewing in my podcast in future episodes. I have an amateur historian and genealogist.

I'm just in awe of the accomplishments and visions of people who shaped our country. Three women and parents and farmers and builders and entrepreneurs, artists, athletes, police, soldiers and lawyers, profits, creators, politicians, bureaucrats. Those are all the people that I'm going to be interviewing. This podcast is my opportunity to connect with PNADIAN Canadians from across the country to find out how they and their families are contributing to our country. I'll be asking me to them whether they consider themselves Canadian, because I live in Quebec and not everybody here want considers themselves Canadian, but, if so, what it means to them, and I'm really looking forward to exploring and Co creating the Canadian identity with them. Thank you for listening to an apologetically Canadian. This episode was...

...brought to you by notable nonfiction. Notable nonfiction teaches people to grow through their own ingenuity. Find out more at notable nonfictioncom.

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